Through the burgeoning field of technical art history - the interdisciplinary coupling of conservation, historical studies and the natural sciences - the project will use the physical objects as the primary sources of information to elucidate the social and cultural conditions surrounding their making, and the interrelationships between commissioners and craftsmen, merchants and guilds, social structures and society.
The Bregninge Altarpiece Kristin Kausland investigating the Bregninge Altarpiece, ca. 1520, on Ærø, Denmark.

Dusting the Dusk of the Dark Ages

Many intriguing dichotomies surround our knowledge of late medieval church art in Scandinavia, a part of cultural heritage often simply categorised as “objects of Hanseatic import”.

This assumption has proved difficult to refute, due to both the style of these objects – predominantly altarpieces – reflecting common pan-European trends, and their lack of associated documentation. Their “rootless” character has led DATILAS’ trail of research back to where it all began: the medieval craftsman’s workshop.

Through the burgeoning field of technical art history – the interdisciplinary coupling of conservation, historical studies and the natural sciences – the project will use the physical objects as the primary sources of information to elucidate the social and cultural conditions surrounding their making, and the interrelationships between commissioners and craftsmen, merchants and guilds, social structures and society.

The post doc project is conducted at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge and NIKU.

Contact: Kristin Kausland

About DATILAS: https://prosjektbanken.forskningsradet.no/#/project/NFR/274764

  • Status
    In progress
  • Financed by
    The Research Council
  • Time
    2018-2021
Through the burgeoning field of technical art history - the interdisciplinary coupling of conservation, historical studies and the natural sciences - the project will use the physical objects as the primary sources of information to elucidate the social and cultural conditions surrounding their making, and the interrelationships between commissioners and craftsmen, merchants and guilds, social structures and society.
Medieval art Kristin studying the brocade patterns on the altarpiece in Vejlø church, ca. 1510, in Denmark.
Through the burgeoning field of technical art history - the interdisciplinary coupling of conservation, historical studies and the natural sciences - the project will use the physical objects as the primary sources of information to elucidate the social and cultural conditions surrounding their making, and the interrelationships between commissioners and craftsmen, merchants and guilds, social structures and society.
Kristin Kausland Kristin at work in the studio of Hamilton Kerr Institute, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge.